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Recreational and Competitive Canoe/Kayak/SUP Racing is Back

paddlers in boats across the river
Waiting to go; the start line (at the marathon, boats put in and drift about 1/2 block or so to the start line)

After layoffs of 4 years for the Mid-Am and 3 years for the marathon because of the unsafe water conditions and then that cursed virus – Illinois’s two biggest recreational and competitive races are back.

The Des Plaines River Canoe, Kayak, and SUP Marathon and minithon and the Mid-America Canoe Races were welcomed back by hundreds of paddlers most enjoying the experience again after the layoff and the camaraderie that comes when fellow paddlers gather together.

These races give the most competitive paddlers a chance to compete against each other and give less competitive paddlers a chance to test their skill and endurance and maybe beat their buddy or spouse or neighbor or someone, and if not still have fun.

DES PLAINES MARATHON – MAY 22

Water and weather conditions were good and the course record of 2:03 for the 19 mile was challenged, but Joe Crnkovich (from Tennessee) just missed at 2:06:08 while Robert Hartman (Michigan) was only 19 seconds behind Joe. (Next year they should start them in the same heat.)

Changing of the guard so to speak. Kayaks outnumbered canoes with Mens Recreation Kayak being the largest class with 75 boats. Dick Pula (MN) won in 2:49. Women Recreation had 35 boats. (Linda Deith WI 3:06) Competition classes were down. The race that started as a boy scout event, junior class, was very low.

A couple other close races:
  • Mixed Competition:  Beth Schlueter/Dave Timmerman 32 seconds over Barb Brady/Al Limberg
  • C-1 Dave Kies over Ron Koenig by 34 seconds

There were 10 people who did the 19 miles standing up (SUP) while a few more did the short race. Bryan Block (Moline) won in 2:48. (Glitch and apology – the short race start times were not recorded so no times were available).

Although total number registered was a bit lower than pre-virus, there were paddlers from 8 states plus Germany and Australia.

Ages of the paddlers ranged from 7 years old to 6 people over 80. For results and more information, visit canoemarathon.com

Next year May 21, 2023.

MID-AMERICA CANOE RACE

At the finish line, there were so many happy faces. For many it was a chance to see old friends (in my case some really old). It was a festive atmosphere even though the number of entries was lower than usual, but was expected after such a long layoff.
The water was on the low side which made for some slower times, but the weather was good and people were excited.

The fastest time of the day was Jim Pechous, current chairman of the St Charles Canoe Club with a time of 1:34 for the 10 mile course.

Next year June 4, 2023

INNOVATIVE CANOE REPAIR AT MID-AMERICA

When tripping, we always carry some duck tape to repair a canoe or a shoe or whatever. During the Mid-Am race, a canoe hit a sharp rock and put a hole in the bottom. Two C-1 paddlers stopped to help. Solution – they removed the race numbers from their canoe and pasted them over the hole. The repair got them to the end of the race course. Good thinking and good Samaritans.

Cache River Magic

Firefly with colors surrounded by the name, Cache Bayou OutfittersWhen I first visited the Cache River when I was a 13 -year-old boy, I instinctively knew this place had magic. Not the kind of magic that turns frogs into princes, but the kind that fosters the soul and the imagination of children that these wild places still give. The Cache is home to one of the northern most Bald Cypress wetlands in the country and it has a very specialized ecosystem.

Nearly three decades later and countless hours of observation and canoeing on this river, I still continue to wander in this place as I did as a child. As I set out in my handmade Louisiana styled Pirogue (Bald Cypress board canoe), reminiscent of the Cypress swamps of French/Indian influenced Louisiana, I still find magic in this ancient river. I can still discover its natural mystery as I cut through the thick coat of duckweed and hear the countless calls of songbirds around me. It wasn’t long before I encountered a Great Blue Heron, stalking its prey in the murky shallows. With its sword-like piecing head, it looks in my direction, lands and belts out a call that sounds something like it’s from Jurassic Park. Listening to this Alarm call I ask myself what other swamp creatures have now been alerted to my presence. This is referred to as Mowgli’s Jungle Law or in this case, swampland law. It is the natural law for the traveler aware or unaware of their surroundings that every creature knows you’re here as a traveler which may include anything from humans to coyotes. According to this law, concentric rings are sent like ripples in a pond and every creature is alerted to your presence and your potential dangers. Essentially the swamp is alive and knows your movements and knows that you are here and it is watching.

After paddling 4 miles, I reach my river stilt house that sits on the water’s edge. I am just in time to meet with a group for an afternoon paddle and to share some Stone Age swamp craft. They are from Chicago and they have interest in knowing this swamp as ancient man knew it. By the time the afternoon has passed, I will have showed them basic friction fire craft, wild foods of the river area, how to procure water, how to weave a cattail mat for bedding, and how to survive if one is lost in these wilds. Soon after these lessons we set out for an afternoon paddle and immerse them to the movement of the river and slow rhythm that persists here.

All this and more are shared here at the home of Cache Bayou Outfitters Inc. It is my hope you will come to the river to reconnect –– both with nature and your ancient self. We provide memorable and exciting group outings for single parties, scouting organizations, church, & camp; civic groups, social clubs, company outings and others wanting a beautiful flat water experience through Illinois’s hidden Bayou known as the Lower Cache River, near Ullin, Illinois.

The Lower Cache Basin is home to the Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge and the Cache River State Natural Area. Thousands of migrating waterfowl have made this bioregion their winter home, making this area a unique ecological treasure. This incredibly distinct area results in 4  physiographic areas including Ozark Plateau, Interior Low plateau, Coastal Plain, and Mississippi Alluvial Plain. The U.N. has it listed as a RAMSAR site “Wetland of International Importance” because of its rich diversity of plant and animal species. The Cache River Wetlands contains 60,000 acres of beautiful forests and wetlands that are inhabited by otters, bobcats, whitetail deer, bald eagles, herons, egrets, and even the occasional cormorants  are sighted periodically along the Cache during the summer months.
Contact Mark Denzer 618-201-4090

Illinois Paddling Council Position Statement on Public Waterways

As the statewide consortium of paddle enthusiasts and regional paddling organizations, the Illinois Paddling Council (IPC) supports all paddlers in their enjoyment of the rivers and lakes of Illinois, a state which is blessed by more miles of paddleable rivers than any other state.  

To that end, we consistently support efforts by public agencies and others to improve paddle craft access to bodies of water by creating kayak/canoe launches on public properties and support the IDNR’s Boat Access Area Development grant program and other similar programs.  

While the IPC will continue to advance access to Illinois rivers by all, the IPC also recognizes that under current Illinois law, riverfront property owners own the property to the centerline of the river. This means that even when using public access points to enter a river, paddlers often must briefly pass through privately held lands. We greatly appreciate property owners who support the paddling community by granting access – or at least not actively thwarting – the passage of paddle craft through their land. In turn, those who use Illinois rivers need to recognize the privilege they have been granted in passing through private land. Landowners are placing a lot of faith in paddlers by allowing us on their property.  We have a responsibility and obligation to pass peacefully, without trespassing, on private lands and always practice ‘leave no trace,’ whether on private or public land.  

The IPC recognizes that a sometimes-unspoken agreement has existed for quite some time between paddlers and those who own the lands through which paddlers seek to paddle. This agreement is easily shattered by the willful acts of some who abuse the landowner’s faith, as the DuPage issue clearly demonstrates.   

The IPC understands the challenges facing all interested parties involved in the DuPage River situation, including the IDNR, private property owners, local public agencies, local businesses, water enthusiasts, and others. In this case, the IPC clearly recognizes the responsibility water enthusiasts must have when using bodies of water, including but not limited to, the obligation not to litter or improperly dispose of garbage and waste, to refrain from noise pollution associated with loud music, and to limit ingress and egress to public lands only. 

As the DuPage River issue works to its conclusion, which we certainly hope will include keeping this river (and many others) accessible to water enthusiasts, our plea is to the paddling and tubing community not to trespass on private lands and to ‘leave no trace’ as they pass through these private and public lands. We greatly appreciate all riparian landowners who allow us on their property.  Our request to riverfront property owners is that they continue to show their faith in responsible members of the watersport community and continue the practice of looking supportively on those who wish to peacefully and briefly enjoy the resource to which they have been provided access. 

Sangamon River Fall Float (Central Illinois)

October 16 @ 12:00 pm7:00 pm

Fall Float Sangamon River

Join Menard County Trails & Greenways on October 16, 2021 as we paddle 5 beautiful miles of the Sangamon River from the Gudgel Bridge to the New Salem riverside picnic area/boat ramp.

Explore on your own or take part in a guided float to learn about the geology, history and nature of the Sangamon River in Menard County. Immediately following the float everyone is invited to socialize around a cozy campfire for a weenie roast (provided with registration).

This stretch of the river has an exceptional natural history story to tell. Each participant who chooses to partake in the guided tour will receive a points-of-interest location map and corresponding handout with a detailed description of each stop. Experts will be floating along with the group to answer questions.

All participants must pre-register! Registration ends October 10th!

EVENT DETAILS & REGISTRATION

Rain Date – October 17, 2021

Illinois Paddling Council’s Position Statement on Public Waterways

As the statewide consortium of paddle enthusiasts and regional paddling organizations, the Illinois Paddling Council (IPC) supports all paddlers in their enjoyment of the rivers and lakes of Illinois, a state which is blessed by more miles of paddleable rivers than any other state.  

To that end, we consistently support efforts by public agencies and others to improve paddle craft access to bodies of water by creating kayak/canoe launches on public properties and support the IDNR’s Boat Access Area Development grant program and other similar programs.  

While the IPC will continue to advance access to Illinois rivers by all, the IPC also recognizes that under current Illinois law, riverfront property owners own the property to the centerline of the river. This means that even when using public access points to enter a river, paddlers often must briefly pass through privately held lands. We greatly appreciate property owners who support the paddling community by granting access – or at least not actively thwarting – the passage of paddle craft through their land. In turn, those who use Illinois rivers need to recognize the privilege they have been granted in passing through private land. Landowners are placing a lot of faith in paddlers by allowing us on their property.  We have a responsibility and obligation to pass peacefully, without trespassing, on private lands and always practice ‘leave no trace,’ whether on private or public land. 

The IPC recognizes that a sometimes-unspoken agreement has existed for quite some time between paddlers and those who own the lands through which paddlers seek to paddle. This agreement is easily shattered by the willful acts of some who abuse the landowner’s faith, as the DuPage issue clearly demonstrates.  

The IPC understands the challenges facing all interested parties involved in the DuPage River situation, including the IDNR, private property owners, local public agencies, local businesses, water enthusiasts, and others. In this case, the IPC clearly recognizes the responsibility water enthusiasts must have when using bodies of water, including but not limited to, the obligation not to litter or improperly dispose of garbage and waste, to refrain from noise pollution associated with loud music, and to limit ingress and egress to public lands only. 

As the DuPage River issue works to its conclusion, which we certainly hope will include keeping this river (and many others) accessible to water enthusiasts, our plea is to the paddling and tubing community not to trespass on private lands and to ‘leave no trace’ as they pass through these private and public lands. We greatly appreciate all riparian landowners who allow us on their property.  Our request to riverfront property owners is that they continue to show their faith in responsible members of the watersport community and continue the practice of looking supportively on those who wish to peacefully and briefly enjoy the resource to which they have been provided access. 

Comments on Illinois Water Plan

By Professor Eric Freyfogle

I would like to offer, in brief form, a legal commentary on the public’s existing rights to make use of Illinois waterways and on the state’s need to do a better job recognizing and respecting these public rights. The first step for the state, as I say below, is to do what it has to my knowledge never done: to undertake a full review of the relevant law to grasp the exact scope of public rights and the very limited ability of the state to constrict those public rights. I write as a long-time Professor of Law at the University of Illinois College of Law who has specialized for decades in property and natural resources law and who has written at length on these subjects, including public rights in waterways. I would be happy to meet with DNR officials or others if it would seem helpful and to offer my legal views at far greater length if there is receptivity to them.

In very brief form, my main conclusions are the following (my legal points, of course, are not here supported):

First, the issue of public rights to use waterways is far more legally complex than commonly understood. Public rights are not simply set by the Illinois definition of navigability, nor are they set by any administrative action of the DNR or other executive body. Public rights emerge out of the interaction of quite a number of bodies of federal and state law. The state law of navigability is one of them, but only one. (The lead rulings here are all well over a century old, and of uncertain strength today.) Federal law plays a role through the public trust doctrine, under which Illinois took title to the lands beneath navigable waters (when it entered the union) subject to the already existing public rights to use them. All such waterways were and remain “forever free” to public use under the original Northwest Ordinance, reenacted as a still- binding federal statute by the first Congress. The federal navigation servitude also comes into play, protecting public rights. And there is more. Illinois like other states has the legal power to expand public access to waterways. It has not done so. It has no power, however, to curtail these public rights to the extent that they are protected by federal law.

Second and related, whether or not DNR or another administrative body designates a waterway or waterway segment as navigable is of no real legal significance. The public holds rights on its own; these rights do not derive from, and are not dependent on, anything that DNR does or does not do. So far as I know, no state law authorizes DNR to expand public rights beyond those guaranteed by federal law. It certainly has no power to curtail federally guaranteed rights. DNR does have certain authority to regulate uses of waters in the public interest, but that authority does not extend to eliminating rights—exactly the evil that the public trust doctrine, the Northwest Ordinance (as re-enacted), and the Navigation Servitude are all intended to forestall. Its power to regulate public property is akin to the rights various public bodies have to regulate uses of private property. DNR does not have the power, through any rulemaking process or otherwise, to decide on its own which waterways will be deemed navigable and which will not..

Third, so far as I know, the state AG has never issued a legal ruling that covers the topic of public rights in anything like its full complexity. The ruling that DNR commonly cites deals with a tangential issue and, as a quick glance at it shows, gives no thought to the bulk of the bodies of relevant law. I attempted to get Mr. Marc Miller, when DNR director, to seek a guiding ruling from the AG’s office, but to no avail. As I told him then, and repeat now, I’m prepared to draft such a legal review if it would be studied seriously by state lawyers in a position to take action.

Finally, it is my view that, in combination, the various sources of federal and state law that protect longstanding public rights to use waterways empower citizens to make use of any waterway that is navigable in fact during any reasonable period of the year. That use includes travel by canoe, a use that was often, when Illinois entered the Union, a commercial use (as well as recreational) and that is a commercial use today given the actions of canoe outfitters and the like. (I don’t mean to suggest that public uses are limited to commercial activities.) Public rights are not dependent on any longstanding public uses of waterways, although such patterns of use can certainly provide evidence of navigability in fact. Public rights, as the U.S. Supreme Court has made clear, are a form of public property and deserve protection that is just as strong as any protection for private property. Further, any obstruction of a public “highway,” including a navigable waterway, is a per se public nuisance under Illinois law. Under old precedent (the value of which today is unclear), any member of the public can use “self help” to abate a public nuisance, meaning can rip out any barrier that blocks a public route just as a person could remove a barrier to a public road. There is also a right to travel onto private land as minimally needed to avoid waterway obstacles.

It has been my sense over the years that DNR officers (and law enforcement generally) have been far too inclined to resolve all doubts about public rights in favor of private landowners. There is, I believe, no justification for this, in law or policy. Public rights are a form of property and deserve equal protection. There are and will always be uncertainties about which waterways are navigable in fact and thus subject to the public’s property right (easement) to use them. When they arise, such disputes should be handled like all disputes between two parties that claim conflicting property rights: they should be left to the parties to work out as a civil dispute, in court if needed. It is inappropriate for law enforcement officials to take the side of private landowners as they so often have done. It is certainly wrong to arrest a boater when the navigability in fact of a waterway is at all in doubt.

Thanks for taking time to consider my comments. I do hope that this long-delayed and much-needed study of Illinois water law in all its aspects will lead state lawyers, finally, to give the issue of public rights the attention it deserves.

Increasing Diversity in Paddlesport

By Sigrid Pilgrim, Director  

The question has been raised how IPC could support increasing inclusiveness of minorities in the sport. 

I do not have the answer, so I asked Tim Mondl from the Forest Preserves of Cook County to share with you about their paddling programs involving inner city schools and other organizations.  Read his article elsewhere in the newsletter.

In the fourteen years that I organized the Evanston Pool Session for CWA, I cannot remember having had a Black student in the class. In the twelve years I chaired Paddling in the Park, we twice hosted a group of Wards of the State (mostly minorities) to participate in our Kids Paddling Playground sponsored by the Lincoln Park Boat Club. I can still see the big smiles on the kids’ faces once they overcame the initial apprehension about being in the boat – and – getting a little too brave, until the inevitable tip-over, which quickly extinguished all bravery.

So how can we increase minority participation in our sport? Perhaps best by supporting with time and money those organizations that have it as their mission to do so. Participation in paddlesport is expensive as we all know, even second or third hand equipment eventually adds up to what is better spent on food or rent. Then there is the issue of how to get to the place to paddle, which for youngsters, requires a parent to get involved. And….two or three low paying jobs don’t really allow for this either.

So please – support the following organizations – and there may be others, too.

FOREST PRESERVE FOUNDATIONwww.forestpreservefoundation.org

CHICAGO ADVENTURE THERAPYwww.chicagoadventuretherapy.org

CHICAGO VOYAGERSwww.chicagovoyagers.org

MELANIN BASE CAMPwww.melaninbasecamp.com

Safety on the Water

By Greg Taylor

SO, now that we are dealing with this lifestyle-changing, pandemic virus lockdown, I’m hearing on the street and in the news that personal watercraft and bicycles are flying off the shelves. Go to any Walmart and try to buy a bike, or Menards for a kayak, or Dick’s for a canoe. These places are making a killing selling them. Tires and inner tubes for bikes are virtually non-existent. I know most of you who are reading this are highly interested in personal propulsion watercraft. So there is now definitely a fairly large new group of paddlers plying local streams, lakes, and rivers. We are now looking at a large potential group of people not following highly suggested guidance on safe paddling, such as not drinking while enjoying their easy going paddle down a wide beautiful river like the Fox in Illinois. I am not going to say it is not tempting, yes it surely is, but two things should make you think twice: first one is about as easy as the second one. First, I wouldn’t want to have to be forced into a decision-defining moment such as a strainer while inebriated. The second is just as easy. I am not driving home buzzed.

Newbies to our time-honored fabulous sport need a tremendous amount of training and time in the saddle to paddle safely. So while writing this article, I was unfortunately disturbed to open my Facebook feed and find a video of a man at Hammel Woods caught in a low head dam. Commentators stated, “he just wanted to go fishing.” Later I opened up Facebook again and a gentleman that I found I’ve met before at PSC training session posted an article about a family of six that were rescued from the DuPage River near Channahon on Sunday. Their rafts became deflated and they luckily found shelter on a tree in the water. Some of the individuals were found with personal floatation devices, others were not. Sorry to be such a downer during an even more depressing social disaster we are all having to live through, but potentially life-ending situations like this are absurd to be happening. I can only fear that they are only going to increase through the summer into late fall. The uninformed in our sport are also creating an unnecessary danger to themselves. I am thinking it is time to make it mandatory that people must pass a test and become certified before buying a canoe, kayak, stand up paddle board, etc. You need a driver’s license before you can buy a car. You have to have a pilot’s license to fly a plane. You need a FOID card before you can buy a firearm in this state. Anyone can discharge a firearm like anyone can successfully paddle a boat? Although possible, not the wisest decision without the proper training.
Editor’s note: IPC has been working with the WSF to address the issue of newcomers to the sport by contacting the big box stores to give out safety information.  Please see more about their latest work here.

River Management Society and Chapter Leadership

Summary information about River Management SocietyMeet the RMS!

The River Management Society (RMS) is the nation’s only network whose mission is to support professionals who study, protect and manage North America’s rivers. RMS connects those who work on and for rivers: outfitters and guides, river rangers, landscape architects and planners, environmental lawyers, fluvial geomorphologists, scientists and students.  Members represent a tradition of expertise and experience among those who work with, and for, federal and state agency, water trail, recreation and advocacy organizations.  

We are proud of several major initiatives created during the past few years, which include:

The National Rivers Project, an evolving national database of rivers that allow visitors to ‘shop’ for a water trail, whitewater or wild and scenic river experience by state or federal agency.  Thanks to well over forty partners, the http://www.nationalriversproject.com website includes over 1,000 rivers and over 14,000 access points, most recently adding many rivers in Illinois, Ohio, Missouri and Indiana.

The River Training Center is new and developing on-demand webinars like one held recently about the River Access Planning Guide for folks interested in designing, redesigning or re-purposing a river access site as use and demand change or grow.  If you are interested in seeing the webinar, please email RMS at rms@river-management.org, for it was not yet posted at the time of this writing.

Hydropower License Summaries – Helpful to paddlers who have been involved as an advocate for recreational releases from a hydropower dam RMS.  Hydro licenses are beasts, often 150-200 pages in length, and these summaries provide easily digestible ‘Cliff Notes’ versions which allow project stakeholders to learn their basic provisions, like the organizations involved with their negotiations and the days and times of annual scheduled recreational releases. 

RMS is seeking new participation from the Midwest and its states which collectively boast so many wonderful recreational river miles.  We would love to help grow a posse of river stewards who work with each other and agencies to go a bit beyond simply enjoying the rivers by plowing the sometimes complicated issues related to insuring equitable access, managing use conflicts and paying for new or improved access for everyone who has discovered the joy of running rivers.

Please visit river-management.org to learn more about the organization and contact Risa Shimoda if you would like to help paddlers, managers and stewards share experiences and insure a healthy and wise management future for our rivers!  

Risa Shimoda, Executive Director

RMS River Access Planning Guide cover page