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IPC Annual Meeting

IPC Annual Meeting

11/3/2021

7:00pm 

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us06web.zoom.us/j/89021872687

Agenda:

  1.  Election of Officers
  2. Presentations:

Presenter:  Mike Wiant

Title: History of Illinois Rivers

Abstract:  Illinois Rivers and their usage throughout history.

 

Presenter:  Greg Taylor

Title:   350th anniversary of Marquette and Joliet’s expedition to find the source of the Mississippi River.

Abstract: 

In 2023 it will have been 350 years since this monumental expedition took place.Cementing forever the value of the lower half of the North American continent we today call The United States of America to France. The original expedition opened up the lower half of North America to colonization for France and ultimately the doubling in land mass area for a fledgling country to grow and prosper, fulfilling and spurring on the current economic growth that this country has enjoyed for the last 218 years. I am organizing, leading and funding through donations,merchandise sales and grant writings the re-enactment of Jolliet and Marquette’s landmark expedition of discovery from May 17th,1673 of the Mississippi River.
There are 4 spots in two vehicles for a liason team that will shadow us on dry land in vehicles that will go ahead of us geographically to verify the town conditions for our landings for the day or evening, depending on weather and other factors.I am currently accepting applications for participants to join the crew that will be in the canoes doing the water facet of the expedition and the liaison team itself. Which is just as critical to this expedition as the voyagers are.

2021 IPC Annual Meeting

Email

 

IPC Annual Meeting

11/3/2021 

7:00pm 

Join Zoom Meeting

 

 

Agenda:

  1.  Election of Officers
  2. Presentations:

Presenter:  Mike Wiant

Title: History of Illinois Rivers

Abstract:  Illinois Rivers and their usage throughout history.

Dr. Michael Wiant, one of Illinois’s most renowned archaeologists, has a long and distinguished career culminating with his tenure as the director of the Dickson Mounds Museum. In 2016 he was appointed as Interim Director for the Illinois State Museum, serving until December 31, 2017 when he retired. Among Michael’s interests, experiences and specialties are the recovery technique of flotation, contract archaeology, as well as interpretations of the prehistoric residents of the Illinois River valley, and dissemination of archaeological knowledge to the public.

 

Presenter:  Greg Taylor

Title:   350th anniversary of Marquette and Joliet’s expedition to find the source of the Mississippi River.

Abstract: 

In 2023 it will have been 350 years since this monumental expedition took place.Cementing forever the value of the lower half of the North American continent we today call The United States of America to France. The original expedition opened up the lower half of North America to colonization for France and ultimately the doubling in land mass area for a fledgling country to grow and prosper, fulfilling and spurring on the current economic growth that this country has enjoyed for the last 218 years. I am organizing, leading and funding through donations,merchandise sales and grant writings the re-enactment of Jolliet and Marquette’s landmark expedition of discovery from May 17th,1673 of the Mississippi River.
There are 4 spots in two vehicles for a liason team that will shadow us on dry land in vehicles that will go ahead of us geographically to verify the town conditions for our landings for the day or evening, depending on weather and other factors.I am currently accepting applications for participants to join the crew that will be in the canoes doing the water facet of the expedition and the liaison team itself. Which is just as critical to this expedition as the voyagers are.

Illinois Paddling Council Position Statement on Public Waterways

As the statewide consortium of paddle enthusiasts and regional paddling organizations, the Illinois Paddling Council (IPC) supports all paddlers in their enjoyment of the rivers and lakes of Illinois, a state which is blessed by more miles of paddleable rivers than any other state.  

To that end, we consistently support efforts by public agencies and others to improve paddle craft access to bodies of water by creating kayak/canoe launches on public properties and support the IDNR’s Boat Access Area Development grant program and other similar programs.  

While the IPC will continue to advance access to Illinois rivers by all, the IPC also recognizes that under current Illinois law, riverfront property owners own the property to the centerline of the river. This means that even when using public access points to enter a river, paddlers often must briefly pass through privately held lands. We greatly appreciate property owners who support the paddling community by granting access – or at least not actively thwarting – the passage of paddle craft through their land. In turn, those who use Illinois rivers need to recognize the privilege they have been granted in passing through private land. Landowners are placing a lot of faith in paddlers by allowing us on their property.  We have a responsibility and obligation to pass peacefully, without trespassing, on private lands and always practice ‘leave no trace,’ whether on private or public land.  

The IPC recognizes that a sometimes-unspoken agreement has existed for quite some time between paddlers and those who own the lands through which paddlers seek to paddle. This agreement is easily shattered by the willful acts of some who abuse the landowner’s faith, as the DuPage issue clearly demonstrates.   

The IPC understands the challenges facing all interested parties involved in the DuPage River situation, including the IDNR, private property owners, local public agencies, local businesses, water enthusiasts, and others. In this case, the IPC clearly recognizes the responsibility water enthusiasts must have when using bodies of water, including but not limited to, the obligation not to litter or improperly dispose of garbage and waste, to refrain from noise pollution associated with loud music, and to limit ingress and egress to public lands only. 

As the DuPage River issue works to its conclusion, which we certainly hope will include keeping this river (and many others) accessible to water enthusiasts, our plea is to the paddling and tubing community not to trespass on private lands and to ‘leave no trace’ as they pass through these private and public lands. We greatly appreciate all riparian landowners who allow us on their property.  Our request to riverfront property owners is that they continue to show their faith in responsible members of the watersport community and continue the practice of looking supportively on those who wish to peacefully and briefly enjoy the resource to which they have been provided access. 

Sangamon River Fall Float (Central Illinois)

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October 16 @ 12:00 pm7:00 pm

Fall Float Sangamon River

Join Menard County Trails & Greenways on October 16, 2021 as we paddle 5 beautiful miles of the Sangamon River from the Gudgel Bridge to the New Salem riverside picnic area/boat ramp.

Explore on your own or take part in a guided float to learn about the geology, history and nature of the Sangamon River in Menard County. Immediately following the float everyone is invited to socialize around a cozy campfire for a weenie roast (provided with registration).

This stretch of the river has an exceptional natural history story to tell. Each participant who chooses to partake in the guided tour will receive a points-of-interest location map and corresponding handout with a detailed description of each stop. Experts will be floating along with the group to answer questions.

All participants must pre-register! Registration ends October 10th!

EVENT DETAILS & REGISTRATION

Rain Date – October 17, 2021

Illinois Paddling Council’s Position Statement on Public Waterways

As the statewide consortium of paddle enthusiasts and regional paddling organizations, the Illinois Paddling Council (IPC) supports all paddlers in their enjoyment of the rivers and lakes of Illinois, a state which is blessed by more miles of paddleable rivers than any other state.  

To that end, we consistently support efforts by public agencies and others to improve paddle craft access to bodies of water by creating kayak/canoe launches on public properties and support the IDNR’s Boat Access Area Development grant program and other similar programs.  

While the IPC will continue to advance access to Illinois rivers by all, the IPC also recognizes that under current Illinois law, riverfront property owners own the property to the centerline of the river. This means that even when using public access points to enter a river, paddlers often must briefly pass through privately held lands. We greatly appreciate property owners who support the paddling community by granting access – or at least not actively thwarting – the passage of paddle craft through their land. In turn, those who use Illinois rivers need to recognize the privilege they have been granted in passing through private land. Landowners are placing a lot of faith in paddlers by allowing us on their property.  We have a responsibility and obligation to pass peacefully, without trespassing, on private lands and always practice ‘leave no trace,’ whether on private or public land. 

The IPC recognizes that a sometimes-unspoken agreement has existed for quite some time between paddlers and those who own the lands through which paddlers seek to paddle. This agreement is easily shattered by the willful acts of some who abuse the landowner’s faith, as the DuPage issue clearly demonstrates.  

The IPC understands the challenges facing all interested parties involved in the DuPage River situation, including the IDNR, private property owners, local public agencies, local businesses, water enthusiasts, and others. In this case, the IPC clearly recognizes the responsibility water enthusiasts must have when using bodies of water, including but not limited to, the obligation not to litter or improperly dispose of garbage and waste, to refrain from noise pollution associated with loud music, and to limit ingress and egress to public lands only. 

As the DuPage River issue works to its conclusion, which we certainly hope will include keeping this river (and many others) accessible to water enthusiasts, our plea is to the paddling and tubing community not to trespass on private lands and to ‘leave no trace’ as they pass through these private and public lands. We greatly appreciate all riparian landowners who allow us on their property.  Our request to riverfront property owners is that they continue to show their faith in responsible members of the watersport community and continue the practice of looking supportively on those who wish to peacefully and briefly enjoy the resource to which they have been provided access. 

Comments on Illinois Water Plan

By Professor Eric Freyfogle

I would like to offer, in brief form, a legal commentary on the public’s existing rights to make use of Illinois waterways and on the state’s need to do a better job recognizing and respecting these public rights. The first step for the state, as I say below, is to do what it has to my knowledge never done: to undertake a full review of the relevant law to grasp the exact scope of public rights and the very limited ability of the state to constrict those public rights. I write as a long-time Professor of Law at the University of Illinois College of Law who has specialized for decades in property and natural resources law and who has written at length on these subjects, including public rights in waterways. I would be happy to meet with DNR officials or others if it would seem helpful and to offer my legal views at far greater length if there is receptivity to them.

In very brief form, my main conclusions are the following (my legal points, of course, are not here supported):

First, the issue of public rights to use waterways is far more legally complex than commonly understood. Public rights are not simply set by the Illinois definition of navigability, nor are they set by any administrative action of the DNR or other executive body. Public rights emerge out of the interaction of quite a number of bodies of federal and state law. The state law of navigability is one of them, but only one. (The lead rulings here are all well over a century old, and of uncertain strength today.) Federal law plays a role through the public trust doctrine, under which Illinois took title to the lands beneath navigable waters (when it entered the union) subject to the already existing public rights to use them. All such waterways were and remain “forever free” to public use under the original Northwest Ordinance, reenacted as a still- binding federal statute by the first Congress. The federal navigation servitude also comes into play, protecting public rights. And there is more. Illinois like other states has the legal power to expand public access to waterways. It has not done so. It has no power, however, to curtail these public rights to the extent that they are protected by federal law.

Second and related, whether or not DNR or another administrative body designates a waterway or waterway segment as navigable is of no real legal significance. The public holds rights on its own; these rights do not derive from, and are not dependent on, anything that DNR does or does not do. So far as I know, no state law authorizes DNR to expand public rights beyond those guaranteed by federal law. It certainly has no power to curtail federally guaranteed rights. DNR does have certain authority to regulate uses of waters in the public interest, but that authority does not extend to eliminating rights—exactly the evil that the public trust doctrine, the Northwest Ordinance (as re-enacted), and the Navigation Servitude are all intended to forestall. Its power to regulate public property is akin to the rights various public bodies have to regulate uses of private property. DNR does not have the power, through any rulemaking process or otherwise, to decide on its own which waterways will be deemed navigable and which will not..

Third, so far as I know, the state AG has never issued a legal ruling that covers the topic of public rights in anything like its full complexity. The ruling that DNR commonly cites deals with a tangential issue and, as a quick glance at it shows, gives no thought to the bulk of the bodies of relevant law. I attempted to get Mr. Marc Miller, when DNR director, to seek a guiding ruling from the AG’s office, but to no avail. As I told him then, and repeat now, I’m prepared to draft such a legal review if it would be studied seriously by state lawyers in a position to take action.

Finally, it is my view that, in combination, the various sources of federal and state law that protect longstanding public rights to use waterways empower citizens to make use of any waterway that is navigable in fact during any reasonable period of the year. That use includes travel by canoe, a use that was often, when Illinois entered the Union, a commercial use (as well as recreational) and that is a commercial use today given the actions of canoe outfitters and the like. (I don’t mean to suggest that public uses are limited to commercial activities.) Public rights are not dependent on any longstanding public uses of waterways, although such patterns of use can certainly provide evidence of navigability in fact. Public rights, as the U.S. Supreme Court has made clear, are a form of public property and deserve protection that is just as strong as any protection for private property. Further, any obstruction of a public “highway,” including a navigable waterway, is a per se public nuisance under Illinois law. Under old precedent (the value of which today is unclear), any member of the public can use “self help” to abate a public nuisance, meaning can rip out any barrier that blocks a public route just as a person could remove a barrier to a public road. There is also a right to travel onto private land as minimally needed to avoid waterway obstacles.

It has been my sense over the years that DNR officers (and law enforcement generally) have been far too inclined to resolve all doubts about public rights in favor of private landowners. There is, I believe, no justification for this, in law or policy. Public rights are a form of property and deserve equal protection. There are and will always be uncertainties about which waterways are navigable in fact and thus subject to the public’s property right (easement) to use them. When they arise, such disputes should be handled like all disputes between two parties that claim conflicting property rights: they should be left to the parties to work out as a civil dispute, in court if needed. It is inappropriate for law enforcement officials to take the side of private landowners as they so often have done. It is certainly wrong to arrest a boater when the navigability in fact of a waterway is at all in doubt.

Thanks for taking time to consider my comments. I do hope that this long-delayed and much-needed study of Illinois water law in all its aspects will lead state lawyers, finally, to give the issue of public rights the attention it deserves.

From the President’s Desk: RE-Due for 2021

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I sincerely hope everyone reading this has had a safe and healthy year.    2020 has been a difficult year for everyone.    In recognition of this, the IPC Board has decided we will carry over 2020 IPC dues to 2021.  If you chose to renew your dues for 2021 you may.  If you are unable to, and were a member of the IPC in 2020, your membership will carry over into 2021.

I hope 2021 is a better year for everyone!

Tom Eckels

Waterway Management Survey – Please take a few minutes

We need your input! Please complete this short survey to provide insight needed to update A Guide for Multiple-Use Waterway Management, Second Edition published in 2004. The Third Edition update will include a website with a compilation of online resources for managers who are responsible for the wise, safe multiple-use of our rivers, lakes, harbors and coastal waterways. 

A great change seen by waterway managers since the 2004 edition is the growth of multiple forms of recreational boating and competing expectations for use of our nation’s waterways. This survey asks you to identify potential challenges faced by waterway managers including drivers of new uses and activities. Survey responses will ensure the Third Edition of the Guide addresses topics of greatest concern with examples, if available, illustrating management challenges and successes. 

Please take a few minutes to complete this survey to ensure your voice is heard and that the updated Guide becomes a reliable resource for you and your colleagues. The 10-question survey should take fewer than eight minutes to complete. Access the survey at this link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/WaterwayManagement

Please share this email and survey link with your colleagues and others interested in multiple-use waterway management. The survey will remain open until August 1, 2020. 

The project is funded under a national non-profit grant from the Sport Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund administered by the United States Coast Guard. The grant was awarded to the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators which is providing program oversight. The project is guided by a project steering committee including representatives from a wide range of user groups and management agencies. For a list of steering committee members and for additional information on the project, visit https://www.nasbla.org/nasblamain/advocacy/waterwaymanagement

On behalf of the project team, thank you for your completion of this short survey. 

Dave Brezina 

Secretary, Chicago Harbor Safety Committee

Increasing Diversity in Paddlesport

By Sigrid Pilgrim, Director  

The question has been raised how IPC could support increasing inclusiveness of minorities in the sport. 

I do not have the answer, so I asked Tim Mondl from the Forest Preserves of Cook County to share with you about their paddling programs involving inner city schools and other organizations.  Read his article elsewhere in the newsletter.

In the fourteen years that I organized the Evanston Pool Session for CWA, I cannot remember having had a Black student in the class. In the twelve years I chaired Paddling in the Park, we twice hosted a group of Wards of the State (mostly minorities) to participate in our Kids Paddling Playground sponsored by the Lincoln Park Boat Club. I can still see the big smiles on the kids’ faces once they overcame the initial apprehension about being in the boat – and – getting a little too brave, until the inevitable tip-over, which quickly extinguished all bravery.

So how can we increase minority participation in our sport? Perhaps best by supporting with time and money those organizations that have it as their mission to do so. Participation in paddlesport is expensive as we all know, even second or third hand equipment eventually adds up to what is better spent on food or rent. Then there is the issue of how to get to the place to paddle, which for youngsters, requires a parent to get involved. And….two or three low paying jobs don’t really allow for this either.

So please – support the following organizations – and there may be others, too.

FOREST PRESERVE FOUNDATIONwww.forestpreservefoundation.org

CHICAGO ADVENTURE THERAPYwww.chicagoadventuretherapy.org

CHICAGO VOYAGERSwww.chicagovoyagers.org

MELANIN BASE CAMPwww.melaninbasecamp.com