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The Sarah Hartman Fund for Paddle Sports Education

This fund assists the development of instructor trainers and advanced level Instructors (ACA Level III or above) and certified instructors residing in Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan.

A one-time $500 honorarium will be awarded upon completion of necessary training and presentation of evidence of certification in any paddling discipline as:

  • An American Canoe Association Instructor Trainer, or Instructor Trainer Educator
  • A United States Canoe Association Trainer
  • A British Canoe Union Level 5 Assessor

A one-time $150 honorarium will be paid to those individuals who present evidence of certification in any paddling discipline as:

  • An American Canoe Association Instructor Level III or above
  • A British Canoe Union Coach 3

These honoraria are designed to reimburse successful trainees for part of the costs incurred during the certification process. No one may receive more than one honorarium. Awards will be made until the fund is depleted.

To ensure the fund will not be depleted – watch for a special raffle announcement to benefit the fund. We gratefully acknowledge the following contributions made already:

  • LL BEAN – $200 Gift Certificate
  • NORTHWEST PASSAGE – Two SUP class certificates valued at $50 each

If you are a business – please consider contributing to the raffle with a product donation or gift certificate.

If you are a paddler, you can make a donation at http://www.illinoispaddling.info/heartland-fund/

2015 Race Schedule

June 13-14     St. Charles Dragon Boat Races

June 28          Voyageur Landing*  Contact: kaab610@aol.com

July 12           Five State Challenge

July 18           Illinois Whitewater Festival & Buttercup Salom Series

July 19           Pecatonica*

July 26          Pontiac*
Aug. 11-16     USCA Nationals

Sept. 12         Joe Kowsky Memorial Race (I &M and Dupage)* – Channahon, IL

                      Full details at the following link –                                    https://www.facebook.com/events/896912217026467/

Sept. 20           Vic Hopp*

Sept. 27           Fall Classic*

Oct. 10-11       Aluminum Nationals

 

*IPC Points Race

Dam Simulator Plans

Want to Build your own Dam Simulator?  We have the plans for that.

When presenting the Dam Simulator, Please make sure you recognize:

 Illinois Paddling council

Sigrid Pilgrim, president of the IPC at the time the Dam was Built

Dam Simulator Design and Engineering: Susan Sherrod

Dam Builder: Joel Neuman, B&N Products, Palatine, Illinois, USA,

And the Baxter foundation for their funding of the project…

Additional info in ACA web site:  http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.americancanoe.org/resource/resmgr/sei-educational_resources/article_dam_simulator.pdf

dam simulator plans

LINCOLN HERITAGE WATER TRAIL – http://www.lincolnheritagewatertrail.org/

LINCOLN HERITAGE WATER TRAIL – http://www.lincolnheritagewatertrail.org/

The Lincoln Heritage Water Trail spans two historic sites – the Lincoln Homestead State Park near Decatur and the New Salem State Historic Site near Petersburg. These sites bracket an Abraham Lincoln tale, replete with quick wit and strong will, that began in 1831. It starts with a canoe trip by a 22-year-old Lincoln upon a flooding Sangamon River from his family’s homestead site near Decatur to the Springfield area. At Sangamo Town, seven miles northwest of Springfield, he built an 80-foot flatboat and set off for New Orleans but ran aground at the mill dam below the New Salem bluff. Undaunted, he saved it from sinking (with an auger commandeered from the village cooper shop) before continuing his journey.

The Lincoln Heritage Water Trail Association works to create a living tribute to the Sangamon River and open it up to e

exploring the water and landscape, largely unchanged from Lincoln’s time.  The Sangamon River offers a rare opportunity to canoe, kayak, fish or just float and take photos of native life on the Illinois prairie and the rolling hills of the river valley.

The stretch of the Sangamon River from Decatur to Petersburg, has the direct historical connection with the life of Abraham Lincoln and was first formally recognized in 1965 when Illinois Governor Otto Kerner designated it as the Lincoln Heritage Canoe Trail.

Currently, the Lincoln Heritage Water Trail is being expanded to the river’s upper reaches, thanks to the efforts of the Upper Sangamon River Conservancy (http://sangamonriver.org)  and the Sangamon River Alliance (http://sangamonriveralliance.org). For more information on either of these groups, please contact Scott Hays at sphays12@gmaiol.com

2017 Competition Results

IPC’s Competition Committee every year sponsors several races.  Points are given for each race a paddler enters. To qualify for a trophy, a paddler be an IPC member and enter half of the races in the particular class s/he enters. Points from the best half of the races, plus one, will be used to determine the class champion. First place is awarded 10 points, 2nd = 9, 3rd = 8, ect. down to 5th = 6 pts. Winners are announced at the annual Awards Dinner with the first place winner able to enjoy the travelling trophy for a year. Sixtytwo paddlers participated in the events below in 2017 – let’s try to double that number in 2018!

The Points Races for 2017

Current Buster on the Fox River – St Charles

Des Plaines River Canoe and Kayak Marathon

Voyageur Landing on the Fox- Elgin

Pontiac Race on the Vermilion River – Pontiac

Joe Kowsky Race on the DuPage River – Channahon

Vic Hopp Rac on the Des Plaines – Dam # 1

Flatwater Classic on the Fox River -St Charles

The Pecatonica in Freeport was canceled because of high water

 

And the Winners are:

Adult/Youth – Ray & Dylan Grzenia, 2nd Ben & Luke Josefik

C2 – Standard Pat Faul/ Steve Conlon

C2 Men – Dave Buckley

C2 Master- Kevin Bradley/Don Mueggenborg, 2nd Ed Hahn

C-1 – Jody Runyon, 2nd Dave Kies

Sea kayak – Jim Pechous

 

Jim Pechous is PADDLER OF THE YEAR – having committed to and actually paddled 1200 miles this year.

He is shown with the travelling kayak trophy – it can be yours to enjoy for a year if you win enough K1 races in 2018.

KANKAKEE RIVER NATIONAL WATER TRAIL – http://www.kankakeeriverwatertrail.org

Claimed to be one of the cleanest rivers in the Midwest, the Kankakee has ancient wetlands, cliffs and canyons, wooded islands and the gentle farmlands of northwestern Indiana and northeastern Illinois along the 133-mile stretch. There are four distinct trips – check the website and trip map for details:

  1. Upper River – Kankakee Headwaters to the Yellow River: This entirely channelized section runs through farmland, with very little tree cover in many areas.

 

  1. Wooded Channel – Yellow River to the State Line: This mostly channelized section has more tree cover and runs through several state parks and conservation areas.

 

  1. Ancient Wetland – State Line to Momence: At the Illinois state line, the river reverts to a natural meandering course through some of the best wetland habitat in the Prairie State.

 

  1. Grand Waterway – Momence to the Illinois River: A boater’s and paddler’s playground through urban and suburban areas, with a long run through Kankakee State Park before meeting the Illinois River.

 

Recognizing the cultural, environmental, recreational and economic significance of the Kankakee River, its 2016 designation as a National Water Trail, and its related watershed, various individuals came together in 2017 to create the Potawatomi Paddlers Association (PPA). This organization was formed to encourage and enable safe and environmentally-sensitive recreational use of the Illinois portion of Kankakee River National Water Trail for paddle sports, leave-no-trace camping and other non-motorized activities by all people attracted to the physical, mental and spiritual benefits of river recreation. This mission will be accomplished through the planning and implementation of public information and education campaigns, and through activities that build and sustain a positive recreational environment.

 

The focus of the PPA is to carry out a myriad of planning initiatives and play a key role in changing how municipalities within the Kankakee River watershed treat the River in development ordinances and plans. This includes but is not limited to river edge improvements to include boat landings, water side parks and other enhancements; policy initiatives aimed at improving the quality of the river so that it can support native plants, fish and other wildlife and a variety of recreational uses; on-the-ground projects that result in physical improvements and preservation of quality habitat; and education and outreach programs that inform and inspire people to help revitalize the Kankakee River.

 

The PPA meets on the second Thursday of each month. As we try to reach out to all areas along the Kankakee River between Momence and Wilmington, the location of our monthly meeting changes each month. Times and locations of our meetings are posted on our Facebook page.

 

For more information, please contact the Potawatomi Paddlers Association at P. O. Box 503, Kankakee, IL 60901, or contact PPA President Frank Koehler at fjkoehler@aol.com.

 

THE PECATONICA RIVER WATER TRAIL – http://www.paddlethepec.com/

THE PECATONICA RIVER WATER TRAIL – http://www.paddlethepec.com/

Established in 2006 by an intrepid group of paddlers who cleared tons of debris from the river, raised funds to establish ADA accessible boat launches, put in place concrete picnic tables that wouldn’t wash away in a flood, Paddle The Pec is described as Illinois’ Most Friendly Paddle. There are eight sections described on the website.

The river’s best friend is the Friends of the Pecatonica Foundation. Its mission is to preserve, protect, and foster the vitality of the Pecatonica River for the plant, animal and human communities within the Stephenson County, Illinois watershed.

The Pecatonica River enters Illinois at Stephenson County north of Winslow. The name is believed to be Native American for crooked stream. The Pecatonica River is 58 miles long in Stephenson County and 94 miles in Illinois. The river joins the Rock River at Macktown, near Rockton. The early years saw roads develop all over the county. Many of the roads connected the mills that were in use in the county. Crossing the Pecatonica resulted in several ferries operating in the county. Toll bridges replaced the ferries and would be replaced with public owned bridges. The railroad was a significant influence for the area.

The organization has two very interesting postcard books of historic river scene photos going back to the turn of the century which they use as a fund raiser. For more details – contact pecriver@pecriver.org, or Joe Ginger jtginger@mac.com

Picture shows McConnell’s Bobtown Landing

 

WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS FOX RIVER WATER TRAIL INITIATIVE – UNDER DEVELOPMENT – http://www.foxriverecosystem.org/trail.htm

The Fox River of Illinois—not to be confused with the Fox River of central Wisconsin—arises in southern Wisconsin in a lake basin about 15 miles northwest of Milwaukee. From this point, the Fox flows southward for over 200 miles (114 miles in Illinois) and drops 470 vertical feet to reach its confluence with the Illinois River. As the Fox enters Illinois, it passes through Illinois’ Chain o’ Lakes and then meanders southward through Lake, McHenry, Kane, Kendall and LaSalle Counties.

The Fox River is a major waterway with many small islands. Its steep valley has an average gradient of 3.6 feet per mile, and its strong flow made the stream a good source for industrial waterpower. This led to early industrial development with many dams and mills built on the stream. Now most of the old mill dams are gone, but they have been replaced by hydroelectric, flood control, and navigation dams.

The Fox River Ecosystem Partnership (FREP) was formed in 1996 after the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) designated a core of high-quality ecological resources in the northern-most watershed as a “Resource Rich Area”.  Portions of eleven counties, including Lake, McHenry, Kane, Kendall and LaSalle, form the Fox River watershed, which is home to 11% of the state’s population.

FREP has joined with the Southeast Wisconsin Fox River Partnership and the Village of Waterford, Wisconsin, to pursue the designation of all or portions of the Fox River in Wisconsin and Illinois as a National Water Trail through the National Park Services’ National Water Trail System. Technical assistance from the NPS Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance Program has been awarded and planning is now proceeding.

Volunteers are needed to submit information about paddling the river, historic information, and more.

 

Contact Karen Miller millerkaren@co.kane.il.us for more details

North East Illinois WATER TRAIL INFORMATION

The Northeastern Illinois Regional Water Trails Plan was originally conceived by Gary Mechanic as national efforts to establish water trails and their benefits to local communities became better  known. This plan established a vision for providing water trails for non-motorized boating on ten of the Chicago area’s waterways. Designed by representatives from local governments, tourism advocates, conservationists and paddlers, the plan designated nearly 500 miles of waterways as recreational water trails.

These water trails include the Calumet Area, Chicago River, Des Plaines, DuPage, Fox, Kankakee, Kishwaukee, Nippersink, Salt Creek and Lake Michigan. Details:  https://paddleillinoiswatertrails.org/

 

FOR FURTHER READING AND SOURCES USED:

 Public Waters in Illinois

https://www.dnr.illinois.gov/waterresources/pages/publicwaters.aspx

For an interactive map of publicly navigable waters

http://idnr.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=b64decfb69504164a46badb2841ebb11

 

Water Trail details from the National Park Service

https://www.nps.gov/watertrails/

http://www.americantrails.org/resources/water/National-Water-Trails-overview.html

 

Lincoln Heritage River Trail Report

https://www.dnr.illinois.gov/recreation/greenwaysandtrails/Documents/LincolnHeritageRiverTrailReportPart1.pdf

http://illinoistimes.com/article-13054-paddling-the-sangamon-river-water-trail.html

 

Banner Marsh

https://www.dnr.illinois.gov/Parks/Pages/BannerMarsh.aspx

Fox River

http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/481.html

http://www.foxriverecosystem.org/pdfs/Summit16/Ewald-Miller-FoxWaterTrail.pdf

 

For a national list of water trails

www.watertrailslocator.com

 

 

 

 

BANNER MARSH

 

BANNER MARSH – http://www.illinoispaddling.info/2015/09/banner-marsh-water-trail-project/

 

The Banner Marsh Canoe Trail was officially established in 2016 and is part of the Banner Marsh State Fish & Wildlife Area and is located approximately 25 miles southwest of Peoria on U.S. Route 24. It is protected from the Illinois River by a major levee. Teeming with fish and wildlife, Banner Marsh provides various outdoor activities, including hunting, fishing, boating, dog training, picnicking, wildlife observation and photography. Three public access areas lead into Banner Marsh, all of which have parking lots, boat ramps, restrooms and picnic areas. The only type of camping allowed at Banner Marsh is youth group camping. Nearby Rice Lake State Fish & Wildlife Area has camping facilities available.

Contact Jeff Fitch for more information: jdf1966@yahoo.com

The Northeastern Illinois Regional Water Trails

 

The Northeastern Illinois Regional Water Trails Plan was originally conceived by Gary Mechanic as national efforts to establish water trails and their benefits to local communities became better  known. This plan established a vision for providing water trails for non-motorized boating on ten of the Chicago area’s waterways. Designed by representatives from local governments, tourism advocates, conservationists and paddlers, the plan designated nearly 500 miles of waterways as recreational water trails.

These water trails include the Calumet Area, Chicago River, Des Plaines, DuPage, Fox, Kankakee, Kishwaukee, Nippersink, Salt Creek and Lake Michigan. Details can be found on the OpenLands Website:  https://paddleillinoiswatertrails.org/

 

FOR FURTHER READIND AND SOURCES USED:

 

Public Waters in Illinois

https://www.dnr.illinois.gov/waterresources/pages/publicwaters.aspx

For an interactive map of publicly navigable waters

http://idnr.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=b64decfb69504164a46badb2841ebb11

Water Trail details from the National Park Service

https://www.nps.gov/watertrails/

http://www.americantrails.org/resources/water/National-Water-Trails-overview.html

Lincoln Heritage River Trail Report

https://www.dnr.illinois.gov/recreation/greenwaysandtrails/Documents/LincolnHeritageRiverTrailReportPart1.pdf

http://illinoistimes.com/article-13054-paddling-the-sangamon-river-water-trail.html

Banner Marsh

 https://www.dnr.illinois.gov/Parks/Pages/BannerMarsh.aspx

Fox River

http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/481.html

http://www.foxriverecosystem.org/pdfs/Summit16/Ewald-Miller-FoxWaterTrail.pdf

For a national list of water trails

www.watertrailslocator.com

 

ILLINOIS WATER TRAILS – A SPECIAL ISSUE OF THE ILLINOIS PADDLING COUNCIL

Illinois – according to Wikipedia has 98 rivers. Our state is bordered by 880 miles of rivers and contains a total of 87,110 miles of rivers and streams. IDNR’s list of Public Waters names 48 rivers and lakes, several multiple times. Eliminating the multiple listings for different navigable sections of the same rivers and lakes, there are only 34 rivers officially navigable, which of course, includes such rivers as the Mississippi, Ohio, and Illinois, not always on our most favorite list of rivers to paddle, with, of course, some exceptions.

This special issue of the ILLINOIS PADDLER is dedicated to the group of paddlers, private and public entities, that are working together to establish water trails, the definition of which is

Water trails are marked routes on navigable waterway such as rivers, lakes, canals and coastlines for recreational use. They allow access to waterways for non-motorized boats and sometimes motorized vessels, inner tubes, and other craft.

But this simple definition holds a vast treasure of benefits when National Park Service created the National Water Trails System in 1968:

Recreation Opportunities: The water trail route has established public access points that accommodate a diversity of trip lengths and provide access to a variety of opportunities for recreation and education.

Education: The water trail users are provided with opportunities to learn about the value of water resources, cultural heritage, boating skills, and outdoor ethics.

Conservation: The water trail provides opportunities for communities to develop and implement strategies that enhance and restore the health of the local waterways and surrounding lands.

Community Support: Local communities provide support and advocacy for the maintenance and stewardship of the water trail.

Public Information: The public is provided with accessible and understandable water trail information, including details for identifying access and trail routes; cultural, historic, and natural features; hazards; and water quality. The water trail is promoted to the community and broad national audience.

Trail Maintenance: Demonstrate ability to support routine and long-term maintenance investments on the water trail. Facilities are designed, constructed, and maintained incorporating sustainability principles.

Planning: Maintain a water trail plan that describes a vision, desired future conditions, and strategies to strengthen best management practices.

So congratulations to those groups whose efforts have created or are working hard to establish a now national or state recognized water trail.

hb 435 FULL TEXT

Below is the full text of HB 434.  This repeals the Usage Stemp for Canoes and Kayaks.  Initially we thought that canoes and kayaks would need to register for a 3 year term.  however, as the bill is written, non powered water craft are excluded from this requirement.

 

Public Act 100-0469

HB0434 Enrolled LRB100 06000 RJF 16029 b
    AN ACT concerning government.
    Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois,
represented in the General Assembly:
    Section 5. The Boat Registration and Safety Act is amended
by changing Sections 3-1, 3-2, 3-5, 3-9, 3-11, 3A-1, and 4-1 as
follows:
    (625 ILCS 45/3-1)  (from Ch. 95 1/2, par. 313-1)
    Sec. 3-1. Unlawful operation of unnumbered watercraft.
Every watercraft other than non-powered watercraft on waters
within the jurisdiction of this State shall be numbered. No
person may operate, use, or store or give permission for the
operation, usage, or storage of any such watercraft on such
waters unless it has on board while in operation: the
watercraft is numbered
    (A) A valid certificate of number is issued in accordance
with this Act, or in accordance with applicable Federal law, or
in accordance with a Federally-approved numbering system of
another State, and unless:
        (1) the pocket sized certificate of number awarded to
    such watercraft is in full force and effect; or
        (2) the operator is in possession of a valid 60 day
    temporary permit under this Act. , and (2)
    (B) The the identifying number set forth in the certificate

 

of number is displayed on each side of the bow of such
watercraft.
    The certificate of number, lease, or rental agreement
required by this Section shall be available at all times for
inspection at the request of a federal, State, or local law
enforcement officer on the watercraft for which it is issued.
No person shall operate a watercraft under this Section unless
the certificate of number, lease, or rental agreement required
is carried on board in a manner that it can be handed to a
requesting law enforcement officer for inspection. A holder of
a certificate of number shall notify the Department within 30
days if the holder’s address no longer conforms to the address
appearing on the certificate and shall furnish the Department
with the holder’s new address. The Department may provide for
in its rules and regulations for the surrender of the
certificate bearing the former address and its replacement with
a certificate bearing the new address or for the alteration of
an outstanding certificate to show the new address of the
holder.
(Source: P.A. 97-1136, eff. 1-1-13.)
    (625 ILCS 45/3-2)  (from Ch. 95 1/2, par. 313-2)
    Sec. 3-2. Identification number application. The owner of
each watercraft requiring numbering by this State shall file an
application for number with the Department on forms approved by
it. The application shall be signed by the owner of the

 

watercraft and shall be accompanied by a fee as follows:
    A. (Blank).
    B. Class 1 (all watercraft less
than 16 feet in length, except
non-powered watercraft.)……………………. up to $28 $18
    C. Class 2 (all watercraft 16
feet or more but less than 26 feet in length
except canoes, kayaks, and non-motorized paddle
boats). up to $60 $50
    D. Class 3 (all watercraft 26 feet or more
but less than 40 feet in length)…………….. $150
    E. Class 4 (all watercraft 40 feet in length
or more)………………………………….. $200
    Upon receipt of the application in approved form, and when
satisfied that no tax imposed pursuant to the “Municipal Use
Tax Act” or the “County Use Tax Act” is owed, or that such tax
has been paid, the Department shall enter the same upon the
records of its office and issue to the applicant a certificate
of number stating the number awarded to the watercraft and the
name and address of the owner.
    The Department shall deposit 20% of all money collected
from watercraft registrations into the Conservation Police
Operations Assistance Fund. The monies deposited into the
Conservation Police Operations Assistance Fund under this
Section shall not be subject to administrative charges or
chargebacks unless otherwise authorized by this Act.

 

(Source: P.A. 97-1136, eff. 1-1-13.)
    (625 ILCS 45/3-5)  (from Ch. 95 1/2, par. 313-5)
    Sec. 3-5. Transfer of Identification Number. The purchaser
of a watercraft shall, within 15 days after acquiring same,
make application to the Department for transfer to him of the
certificate of number issued to the watercraft giving his name,
address and the number of the boat. The purchaser shall apply
for a transfer-renewal for a fee as prescribed under Section
3-2 of this Act for approximately 3 years. All transfers will
bear September 30 June 30 expiration dates in the calendar year
of expiration. Upon receipt of the application and fee,
together with proof that any tax imposed under the Municipal
Use Tax Act or County Use Tax Act has been paid or that no such
tax is owed, the Department shall transfer the certificate of
number issued to the watercraft to the new owner.
    Unless the application is made and fee paid, and proof of
payment of municipal use tax or county use tax or nonliability
therefor is made, within 30 days, the watercraft shall be
deemed to be without certificate of number and it shall be
unlawful for any person to operate the watercraft until the
certificate is issued.
    Non-powered watercraft are exempt from this Section.
(Source: P.A. 97-1136, eff. 1-1-13.)
    (625 ILCS 45/3-9)  (from Ch. 95 1/2, par. 313-9)

 

    Sec. 3-9. Certificate of Number. Every certificate of
number awarded pursuant to this Act shall continue in full
force and effect for approximately 3 years unless sooner
terminated or discontinued in accordance with this Act. All new
certificates issued will bear September 30 June 30 expiration
dates in the calendar year 3 years after the issuing date.
Provided however, that the Department may, for purposes of
implementing this Section, adopt rules for phasing in the
issuance of new certificates and provide for 1, 2 or 3 year
expiration dates and pro-rated payments or charges for each
registration.
    All certificates shall be renewed for 3 years from the
nearest September 30 June 30 for a fee as prescribed in Section
3-2 of this Act. All certificates will be invalid after October
15 July 15 of the year of expiration. All certificates expiring
in a given year shall be renewed between January 1 and
September 30 June 30 of that year, in order to allow sufficient
time for processing.
    The Department shall issue “registration expiration
decals” with all new certificates of number, all certificates
of number transferred and renewed and all certificates of
number renewed. The decals issued for each year shall be of a
different and distinct color from the decals of each other year
currently displayed. The decals shall be affixed to each side
of the bow of the watercraft, except for federally documented
vessels, in the manner prescribed by the rules and regulations

 

of the Department. Federally documented vessels shall have
decals affixed to the watercraft on each side of the federally
documented name of the vessel in the manner prescribed by the
rules and regulations of the Department.
    The Department shall fix a day and month of the year on
which certificates of number due to expire shall lapse and no
longer be of any force and effect unless renewed pursuant to
this Act.
    No number or registration expiration decal other than the
number awarded or the registration expiration decal issued to a
watercraft or granted reciprocity pursuant to this Act shall be
painted, attached, or otherwise displayed on either side of the
bow of such watercraft. A person engaged in the operation of a
licensed boat livery shall pay a fee as prescribed under
Section 3-2 of this Act for each watercraft used in the livery
operation.
    A person engaged in the manufacture or sale of watercraft
of a type otherwise required to be numbered hereunder, upon
application to the Department upon forms prescribed by it, may
obtain certificates of number for use in the testing or
demonstrating of such watercraft upon payment of $10 for each
registration. Certificates of number so issued may be used by
the applicant in the testing or demonstrating of watercraft by
temporary placement of the numbers assigned by such
certificates on the watercraft so tested or demonstrated.
    Non-powered watercraft are exempt from this Section.

 

(Source: P.A. 97-1136, eff. 1-1-13.)
    (625 ILCS 45/3-11)  (from Ch. 95 1/2, par. 313-11)
    Sec. 3-11. Penalty. No person shall at any time falsely
alter or change in any manner a certificate of number or water
usage stamp issued under the provisions hereof, or falsify any
record required by this Act, or counterfeit any form of license
provided for by this Act.
(Source: P.A. 97-1136, eff. 1-1-13.)
    (625 ILCS 45/3A-1)  (from Ch. 95 1/2, par. 313A-1)
    Sec. 3A-1. Certificate of title required.
    (a) Every owner of a watercraft over 21 feet in length
required to be numbered by this State and for which no
certificate of title has been issued by the Department of
Natural Resources shall make application to the Department of
Natural Resources for a certificate of title either before or
at the same time he next applies for issuance, transfer or
renewal of a certificate of number. All watercraft already
covered by a number in full force and effect which has been
awarded to it pursuant to Federal law is exempt from titling
requirements in this Act.
    (b) The Department shall not issue, transfer or renew a
certificate of number unless a certificate of title has been
issued by the Department of Natural Resources or an application
for a certificate of title has been delivered to the

 

Department.
(Source: P.A. 89-445, eff. 2-7-96.)
    (625 ILCS 45/4-1)  (from Ch. 95 1/2, par. 314-1)
    Sec. 4-1. Personal flotation devices.
    A. No person may operate a watercraft unless at least one
U.S. Coast Guard approved PFD of the following types or their
equivalent is on board, so placed as to be readily available
for each person: Type I, Type II or Type III.
    B. No person may operate a personal watercraft or specialty
prop-craft unless each person aboard is wearing a Type I, Type
II, Type III or Type V PFD approved by the United States Coast
Guard. No person on board a personal watercraft shall use an
inflatable PFD in order to meet the PFD requirements of
subsection A of this Section.
    C. No person may operate a watercraft 16 feet or more in
length, except a canoe or kayak, unless at least one readily
accessible United States Type IV U.S. Coast Guard approved
throwable PFD is on board or its equivalent is on board in
addition to the PFD’s required in paragraph A of this Section.
    D. (Blank). A U.S. Coast Guard approved Type V personal
flotation device may be carried in lieu of the Type I, II, III
or IV personal flotation device required in this Section, if
the Type V personal flotation device is approved for the
activity in which it is being used.
    E. When assisting a person on waterskis, aquaplane or

 

similar device, there must be one wearable United States U.S.
Coast Guard approved PFD on board the watercraft for each
person being assisted or towed or worn by the person being
assisted or towed.
    F. No person may operate a watercraft unless each device
required by this Section is:
        1. in serviceable condition Readily accessible;
        2. identified by a label bearing a description and
    approval number demonstrating that the device has been
    approved by the United States Coast Guard In serviceable
    condition;
        3. of Of the appropriate size for the person for whom
    it is intended; and
        4. in the case of a wearable PFD, readily accessible
    aboard the watercraft; Legibly marked with the U.S. Coast
    Guard approval number.
        5. in case of a throwabale PFD, immediately available
    for use;
        6. out of its original packaging; and
        7. not stowed under lock and key.
    G. Approved personal flotation devices are defined as a
device that is approved by the United States Coast Guard under
Title 46 CFR Part 160. follows:
        Type I – A Type I personal flotation device is an
    approved device designed to turn an unconscious person in
    the water from a face downward position to a vertical or

 

    slightly backward position and to have more than 20 pounds
    of buoyancy.
        Type II – A Type II personal flotation device is an
    approved device designed to turn an unconscious person in
    the water from a face downward position to a vertical or
    slightly backward position and to have at least 15 1/2
    pounds of buoyancy.
        Type III – A Type III personal flotation device is an
    approved device designed to keep a conscious person in a
    vertical or slightly backward position and to have at least
    15 1/2 pounds of buoyancy.
        Type IV – A Type IV personal flotation device is an
    approved device designed to be thrown to a person in the
    water and not worn. It is designed to have at least 16 1/2
    pounds of buoyancy.
        Type V – A Type V personal flotation device is an
    approved device for restricted use and is acceptable only
    when used in the activity for which it is approved.
    H. (Blank). The provisions of subsections A through G of
this Section shall not apply to sailboards.
    I. No person may operate a watercraft under 26 feet in
length unless an approved and appropriate sized United States
Coast Guard a Type I, Type II, Type III, or Type V personal
flotation device is being properly worn by each person under
the age of 13 on board the watercraft at all times in which the
watercraft is underway; however, this requirement shall not

 

apply to persons who are below decks or in totally enclosed
cabin spaces. The provisions of this subsection I shall not
apply to a person operating a watercraft on an individual’s
private property.
    J. Racing shells, rowing sculls, racing canoes, and racing
kayaks are exempt from the PFD, of any type, carriage
requirements under this Section provided that the racing shell,
racing scull, racing canoe, or racing kayak is participating in
an event sanctioned by the Department as a PFD optional event.
The Department may adopt rules to implement this subsection.
(Source: P.A. 97-801, eff. 1-1-13; 98-567, eff. 1-1-14.)
    (625 ILCS 45/3-1.5 rep.)
    (625 ILCS 45/3-7.5 rep.)
    Section 10. The Boat Registration and Safety Act is amended
by repealing Sections 3-1.5 and 3-7.5.